Chiropractic Procedure Topics



  Procedures: A-G    Procedures: H-O    Procedures: P-Z  
The following is a list of chiropractic procedure topics covered at ChiroACCESS. Please use the links (topic names) to continue on to the procedure topic's overview page. There you will find a list of current procedure reviews, articles, forms, media and other information relating to that topic.
Acupuncture Therapy OR Acupressure

Acupuncture Therapy OR Acupressure



The first unequivocal documentation of acupuncture dates from 100 BCE and locations of specific acupuncture points from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) (1). Acutherapy is the utilization of fine needles, pressure, laser or electrotherapy to stimulate specific acupuncture points in the treatment of disease or injury.

(1) White A, Ernst E. A brief history of acupuncture. Rheumatology (Oxford) 2004 May;43(5):662-3.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy



Cold application (cryotherapy) is the simplest and most commonly used method for treatment of acute musculoskeletal injury. Among chiropractic practitioners it is the most often utilized (94.5%) passive adjunctive therapy(1). The pathophysiological effects of cold have been well documented. Studies have shown that cold applications can reduce the metabolic rate of a tissue, decrease pain and swelling, and reduce muscle spasm(2). Most health care practitioners are taught to use ice therapy for treatment of bruises, strains, sprains, or muscle tears and most are familiar with the rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) principle following acute soft tissue injury, yet there is little agreement in the literature on the optimum application technique for such care.

(1) Christensen MG, Kollasch MW. Job analysis of chiropractic 2005, Greeley, CO: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners: 2005

(2) Knight KL. Cryotherapy in Sports Injury Management. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 1995

Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic Imaging



Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.
Electric Stimulation Therapy

Electric Stimulation Therapy



The first recorded application of the use of electricity to treat human aliments was in ancient Rome. Anthero, a freed slave, was walking in the surf when he stepped on an electrically charged torpedo fish, shocked himself and was allegedly cured of gout (1). Electric stimulation therapy is the use of electrical currents in the treatment of disease and injury. This category includes a variety of electrical currents to include high voltage galvanic, interferential, Russian stimulation, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and micro-current, etc.

(1) Cambridge NA. Electrical apparatus used in medicine before 1900. Proc R Soc Med 1977 Sep;70(9):635-41.

Electrodiagnosis

Electrodiagnosis



Diagnosis of disease states by recording the spontaneous electrical activity of tissues or organs or by the response to stimulation of electrically excitable tissue.
Exercise Therapy

Exercise Therapy



In the early 20th century R. Tait McKenzie began the process of using exercise as an active treatment for disease and injury rather than to merely maintain heath (1). Exercise therapy is a structured and repetitive physical activity that is utilized to improve function, improve fitness or provide rehabilitation. This category includes aerobic, anaerobic stretching and water exercise, etc.

(1) Moore GE. The role of exercise prescription in chronic disease. Br J Sports Med 2004 Feb;38(1):6-7.