Chiropractic Procedure Reviews

Daniel A. Martinez, MA, DC, Research Scientist

  
Ultrasound (US) has been a widely used and accepted adjunct modality for the management of many musculoskeletal conditions.  It was first introduced as a therapeutic modality in the 1950s, when both animal and human studies demonstrated its ability to safely heat tissue several centimeters below the skin.  In the late 1960s and 1970s, reports on the non-thermal therapeutic effects of US, primarily in the area of enhanced tissue healing, further bolstered its popularity  (1).  Despite the years of clinical use, the lack of studies confirming its benefits has led scientists to question the traditional view of its therapeutic benefits (2).
 
Several papers reviewing the available literature have been published concerning the biophysical effects, application, and efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound, as well as the safety and calibration of ultrasonic equipment (2-7).  The purpose of this paper is to present a general overview of these findings.

ChiroACCESS | 

October 1, 2010

Daniel A. Martinez, MA, DC, Research Scientist

  
Cold application (cryotherapy) is the simplest and most commonly used method for treatment of acute musculoskeletal injury. Among chiropractic practitioners it is the most often utilized (94.5%) passive adjunctive therapy. The pathophysiological effects of cold have been well documented. Studies have shown that cold applications can reduce the metabolic rate of a tissue, decrease pain and swelling, and reduce muscle spasm. Most health care practitioners are taught to use ice therapy for treatment of bruises, strains, sprains, or muscle tears and most are familiar with the rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) principle following acute soft tissue injury, yet there is little agreement in the literature on the optimum application technique for such care.

Parker College of Chiropractic Research Institute | 

February 4, 2008

Dwain M. Daniel, D.C.

  
Traction as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of low back pain has existed for many years. Its use has progressed from simple static traction to intermittent motorized traction. A recent systematic review found only seven randomized controlled trials for intermittent motorized traction and six reported no difference between the traction groups and the control groups. The most recent incarnation of traction has been a form of intermittent motorized traction commonly referred to as spinal decompression therapy. Developers and manufacturers of the equipment and often physicians as well consider it to be a unique form of traction.

Parker College of Chiropractic Research Institute | 

June 1, 2007