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Volume 4, Issue 3 of Topics in Integrative Health Care is Now Available



Published on September 30, 2013

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Topics in Integrative Health CareVolume 4, Issue 3 of Topics in Integrative Health Care is Now Available.

Topics in Integrative Health Care (TIHC) is a peer-reviewed, open-access quarterly online journal.  TIHC can be located on the web at http://www.tihcij.com.

TIHC is dedicated to advancing the integration of multiple disciplines, both complementary and mainstream, into diverse health care settings in order to provide optimal patient care. It presents themed issues on topics of current relevance to health care providers interested in integrative, conservative care, health promotion and disease prevention. It includes international, interdisciplinary Grand Rounds in order to facilitate communication and patient comanagement among various health professions, for the good of patients everywhere.

The current issue’s table of contents:

Editorial


Topics in Integrative Health Care
Cheryl Hawk, DC, PhD, CHES 
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013,Vol. 4(3)  ID: 4.3001


Topics in Integrative Health Care welcomes unsolicited manuscripts with original research, Grand Rounds, clinical briefs and “fast facts” collections. All submissions are peer-reviewed.


Research

Integrated Chiropractic and Acupuncture Treatment for a Patient with Persistent Symptoms of Bell’s Palsy: A Case Report
Antoinette Nguyen, DC, MSHCA, Kevin Rose, DC, MPH, San Hwang, LAc, OMD
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013, Vol. 4(3)  ID:  4.3002

Introduction: This paper reports on a 53-year-old male who presented with sequelae from a case of Bell’s palsy two years prior. He was treated with a combination of chiropractic and acupuncture therapies.

Case Presentation: The patient’s prescribed medication relieved most of his symptoms but at presentation he still experienced occasional slight twitching of the right eye, focal numbness with occasional twitching of the right cheek, difficulty holding water in his mouth while drinking and occasional dripping of saliva. The chiropractic diagnosis was Bell’s palsy, myofascial pain syndrome and vertebral intersegmental dysfunction at the C0-C1 level. His acupuncture diagnosis was Wind Phlegm syndrome.

Interventions and Outcomes: Chiropractic treatment consisted of adjustments to the occiput-C1 level, Myofascial Release Technique and home facial exercises. Acupuncture treatment consisted only of needling. The patient responded rapidly to therapy and was almost symptom-free after three months.

Discussion: Most patients recover spontaneously from Bell’s palsy, but in some patients residual symptoms remain that do not respond to conventional medical therapy. This patient’s symptoms were greatly improved following an integrated therapy approach that included chiropractic and acupuncture treatment. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of this approach.


Clinical Brief: Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Jordan A. Gliedt, DC, Clinton J. Daniels, DC, MS, Dennis E. Enix, DC, MBA
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013, Vol. 4(3)  ID:  4.3003

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a frequently overlooked and misunderstood syndrome which is most often of neurogenic origin. A thorough clinical examination is essential in properly diagnosing TOS, differentiating neurogenic TOS from vascular (arterial or venous) TOS, and effectively managing patients suffering from this condition.


Etiology, Treatment, and Prevention of ITB Syndrome: A Literature Review
Samuel Saikia, DC, Rodger Tepe, PhD
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013, Vol. 4(3)  ID:  4.3004

Background: Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common condition among athletes who participate in sports requiring repetitive knee flexion. Improper biomechanics, weak muscles, and overtraining are contributing factors to the development of ITB.

Objective: This literature review provides an overview of the anatomy, biomechanics, causes, treatment, and prevention of ITB syndrome.

Methods: PubMed (1960-2011) and Sports Science (1960-2011) were searched for sources related to ITB syndrome. Preference was given to more recent articles and journals with higher impact factors when possible.

Results: Forty three sources discussing ITB syndrome anatomy and biomechanics and another 155 sources discussing causes, treatment, and prevention were located out of which 57 were selected for review.

Conclusion: Evidence shows that a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to developing ITB syndrome. Intrinsic factors can often be the result of weak or inhibited muscles, such as the gluteus maximus and gluteus minimus. Extrinsic factors include training habits, including shoe type and increasing training schedules too rapidly. A consensus of literature agrees that proper biomechanics are the critical factor in prevention. Numerous treatment plans have been developed, but none have demonstrated clearly superior outcomes. The best results are obtained with rest during the acute and subacute stages followed by strengthening exercises. More research is needed using objective outcome measures.


Fast Facts
Stacie A. Salsbury, PhD, RN
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013, Vol. 4(3) ID: 4.3005

Readers are welcome to contribute to Fast Facts. Please include the original abstract (with citation) that is the source of your contribution. Contributors’ names will be included along with the item.

The following is an excerpt:

A recent survey of 18 Association of Chiropractic Colleges institutions evaluated the use of chiropractic teaching clinics by patients who are not English language proficient and assessed available language translation resources. The percentage of patients who were not English language proficient averaged 12.5%. Nearly 75% of non-English language proficient patients spoke Spanish as a primary language, and an additional 19.5% of patients spoke Asian languages. Over 55% of surveyed colleges did not offer language-specific treatment consent forms and only 33% had a policy to address language discordance in their teaching clinics. Only one college reported employing a professional translator while most relied on multi-lingual staff to address this gap. The author concludes that chiropractic colleges should develop policies to address the communication needs of the non-English language proficient patients who receive care in chiropractic teaching clinics. The free full text article is available at: http://www.chiromt.com/content/21/1/7


Saporito RP. English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics. Chiropr Man Ther 2013; 21(7).

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