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Volume 3, Issue 2 of Topics in Integrative Health Care is Now Available



Published on June 29, 2012

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Topics in Integrative Health CareVolume 3, Issue 2 of Topics in Integrative Health Care is Now Available.

Topics in Integrative Health Care (TIHC) is a peer-reviewed, open-access quarterly online journal.  TIHC can be located on the web at http://www.tihcij.com.

TIHC is dedicated to advancing the integration of multiple disciplines, both complementary and mainstream, into diverse health care settings in order to provide optimal patient care. It presents themed issues on topics of current relevance to health care providers interested in integrative, conservative care, health promotion and disease prevention. It includes international, interdisciplinary Grand Rounds in order to facilitate communication and patient comanagement among various health professions, for the good of patients everywhere.

The current issue’s table of contents:

Editorial


Topics in Integrative Health Care
Cheryl Hawk, DC, PhD, CHES 
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012,Vol. 3(2)  ID: 3.2001


Topics in Integrative Health Care welcomes unsolicited manuscripts with original research, Grand Rounds, clinical briefs and “fast facts” collections. All submissions are peer-reviewed. For the September 2012 issue, we have tentatively scheduled a theme again focusing on issues in health professions training and education.

Interview

The Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care (ACCAHC): Developing Collaboration Among CAM Professions, Forging Integration with Conventional Health Professions—an Interview with John Weeks
Daniel Redwood, DC
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2)  ID:  3.2002

Research

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Professions Students’ Perceptions about Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Cheryl Hawk, DC, PhD, CHES, Harrison Ndetan, MSc, MPH, DrPH, Anupama Kizhakkeveettil, BAMS (Ayurveda), MAOM, L.Ac., Jerrilyn A. Cambron, LMT, DC, MPH, PhD, Nick Buratovich, NMD, Nancy A. Scarlett, ND, Peggy Smith-Barbaro, PhD
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2)  ID:  3.2003

Objective: To assess the feasibility of collecting data from multiple institutions and to make a preliminary comparison of the attitudes toward interdisciplinary collaboration of complementary and alternative health professions and mainstream health professions students.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 5 health professions training institutions, 4 of which train multiple health professions. Students were approximately midway in their course of training. Attitudes were assessed by means of the 18-item Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS), which measures 4 attitudinal factors (competence and autonomy, perception of need for and actual cooperation, and understanding others’ value) using a 6-point Likert scale, with a total score representing the sum of the factor scores. The survey was administered in class in 4 institutions and electronically in one. An analysis of variance (ANOVA), with a post-hoc Scheffe test for multiple comparisons, was used to compare mean total IEPS scores for students in each profession.

Results: The study was completed in 2012 with 277 students from the following professions: acupuncture/Oriental medicine, chiropractic, massage, naturopathic medicine, and physical therapy. The response rate for in-class administration was 78% but 17% for online administration. Physical therapy students had statistically significantly higher total scores than all the CAM professions except massage therapy.

Conclusion: The results suggest that further exploration of possible differences in attitude between CAM and convention health professions may be warranted, but will require significant efforts to make it feasible.

Clinical Brief: Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome
Jordan Gliedt, DC, Frank Scali, DC
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2) ID: 3.2004

Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome is an increasingly recognized pathology associated primarily with young, active individuals. It is appropriate that health care providers are well educated and knowledgeable in the anatomical aspects, the clinical presentation, and management options when confronted with a patient suffering from Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome.

The Diagnosis of Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome in Two Female Patients With Chronic Pain
Richard Strunk, DC, MS, Mark T. Pfefer, RN, MS, DC, Lyndsay Andrews, R.T. (R) (CT)2
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2) ID: 3.2005

Introduction: Benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder frequently associated with joint pain. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how BJHS was diagnosed in two female patients with chronic pain and to present other associated history and examination findings on these same two patients.

Clinical Presentation: Two female patients, 27 and 32 years of age, with normal body mass indexes presented with a history of chronic spinal pain transiently lessened by multi-modal manual therapy. Each patient was diagnosed with BJHS. Both patients displayed joint hypermobility in the thumb(s), the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint and the lumbopelvic joints by having greater than normal range of motion in specific pre-determined directions. The 27 year old also had hyperextension of her elbows and myopia, while the 32 year had varicose veins and skin striae. Both had a history of back pain for greater than 3 months, key postural abnormalities and significant muscle imbalances. No treatment was administered to either patient since both patients were already currently receiving chiropractic treatment separate from this study.

Discussion: The diagnosis of BJHS can be challenging due to no gold standard test, however it’s an important entity to consider because of its unique characteristics and management implications.

Conclusion: A detailed description of two patients with BJHS is presented. It is important for doctors to be aware of BJHS and to be able to diagnose it so these types of patients can be managed appropriately.

The Role of Complementary and Alternative Health Care Providers in Recognizing Misuse and Abuse of Medications and Addiction
Mark T. Pfefer, RN, MS, DC, Jon D. Wilson, DC, Richard Strunk, DC, MS
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2) ID: 3.2006

Chronic pain and addictive disorders present significant public health problems. Both are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Complementary and alternative health care providers frequently encounter patients who suffer from pain and need to be aware of the potential for addiction in this population. These health care providers should play a role in screening, brief management, or recommending appropriate referral for patients with substance abuse problems. It is important for health care providers to be aware of barriers to screening and to understand that addiction is a treatable disease. Complementary and alternative health care providers should have knowledge of addiction resources, understand the process of screening, and should be able to recognize addiction and help direct patients to programs that can meet their treatment needs.

Overlapping Responsibilities of Certified Health Education Specialists and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine
Brittany Dong, Ronald D. Williams, Jr., PhD, CHES, Barry P. Hunt, EdD
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2) ID: 3.2007

As the U.S. population ages and health needs change throughout the lifespan, the skills and responsibilities of health care professionals must adapt to meet public needs. This article provides a brief history of the overlapping responsibilities of Certified Health Education Specialists and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine, while indicating the potential for collaboration to improve community health.

Fast Facts
Stacie A. Salsbury, PhD, RN
Topics in Integrative Health Care 2012, Vol. 3(2) ID: 3.2008

Readers are welcome to contribute to Fast Facts. Please include the original abstract (with citation) that is the source of your contribution. Contributors’ names will be included along with the item.

The following is an excerpt:

A recent study using regression and geographical information science (GIS) analysis identified supply- and demand-based predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provider office locations in Ontario, Canada. Acupuncture, chiropractic, holistic, homeopathic, massage and naturopathic offices were more common in urban or metropolitan environments than in peripheral locations, as well as in areas with ethnically diverse markets and those where like practitioners were co-located. Chiropractic and massage therapy offices were uniquely and significantly statistically associated with geographic areas of higher family income and higher percent female population. Free full text article is available at: http://www.ijbssnet.com/journals/Vol_3_No_8_Special_Issue_April_2012/3.pdf


Meyer SP. Place-specific explanations for the geographic patterns of complementary and alternative practitioners: contrasting chiropractic, massage, holistic, acupuncture, naturopathic and homeopathic operations in Ontario. International J Business Soc Science 2012;3(8):24-39.

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