Shoulder Impingement Syndrome


Overview

Articles

(2)

Review Sections

(28)
Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Icon    Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

The gleno-humeral joint is commonly accepted to be the most complex joint in the human body. Possibly due to the difficulty of arriving at an accurate diagnosis, the term "shoulder impingement syndrome" (SIS) has become a standard term in shoulder diagnosis. Any condition that narrows the space between the anterior/inferior aspect of the acromion and coracoacromial ligament can result in SIS (1). The most common causative factors are a thickened subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendonopathy.

Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases (2nd edition) defines shoulder impingement syndrome as "Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom."

(1) Calis M, Akgun K, Birtane M, Karacan I, Calis H, Tuzun F. Diagnostic values of clinical diagnostic tests in subacromial impingement syndrome. Ann Rheum Dis 2000; 59(1):44-47.;(2) Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed

Clinical Reviews

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Prevention



Very few high quality studies have been performed to determine risk factors for developing shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Much of what we know relating to risk actors is based on clinical common sense and lower level clinical studies.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Diagnosis



The gleno-humeral joint is commonly accepted to be the most complex joint in the human body. Possibly due to the difficulty of arriving at an accurate diagnosis, the term "shoulder impingement syndrome" (SIS) has become a standard term in shoulder diagnosis. Any condition that narrows the space between the anterior/inferior aspect of the acromion and coracoacromial ligament can result in SIS. The most common causative factors are a thickened subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendonopathy.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Therapy



Effectively treating shoulder pain is a challenge to every clinician. Only limited evidence exists in determining effectiveness for most interventions. A significant problem encountered is the wide varieties of pathologies which may cause shoulder pain and the lack of consistent diagnostic criteria for these different pathologies. For the purpose of this monograph only studies relating to shoulder impingement syndrome will be discussed.

Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) Information

MeSH Term: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Scope Note: Compression of the ROTATOR CUFF tendons and subacromial bursa between the HUMERAL HEAD and the ACROMION of the SCAPULA. This condition is associated with subacromial BURSITIS, as well as rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon INFLAMMATION.

MeSH Synonyms:
  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  • Shoulder Impingement Syndromes
  • Rotator Cuff Impingement Syndrome
  • Rotator Cuff Impingement
  • Impingement, Rotator Cuff
  • Impingements, Rotator Cuff
  • Rotator Cuff Impingements
  • Coracohumeral Impingement Syndrome
  • Coracohumeral Impingement Syndromes
  • Coracoid Impingement Syndrome
  • Coracoid Impingement Syndromes
  • Subacromial Impingement Syndrome
  • Subacromial Impingement Syndromes
  • Coracohumeral Impingement
  • Coracohumeral Impingements
  • Impingement, Coracohumeral
  • Impingements, Coracohumeral
  • Outlet Impingement Syndrome
  • Outlet Impingement Syndromes
  • Outlet Impingement
  • Outlet Impingements
  • Internal Impingement Syndrome
  • Internal Impingement Syndromes
  • Posterosuperior Glenoid Impingement
  • Impingement, Posterosuperior Glenoid
  • Impingements, Posterosuperior Glenoid
  • Posterosuperior Glenoid Impingements
Applicable MeSH Subheadings:
  • analysis
  • anatomy and histology
  • blood
  • chemically induced
  • classification
  • complications
  • congenital
  • diagnosis
  • diagnostic imaging
  • diet therapy
  • drug therapy
  • economics
  • enzymology
  • epidemiology
  • ethnology
  • etiology
  • history
  • immunology
  • metabolism
  • nursing
  • organization and administration
  • pathology
  • physiology
  • physiopathology
  • prevention and control
  • psychology
  • radiotherapy
  • rehabilitation
  • statistics and numerical data
  • surgery
  • therapy
  • veterinary

Informative Links

Arrow

MedlinePlus: Shoulder Injuries and Disorders



MedlinePlus will direct you to information to help answer health questions. MedlinePlus brings together authoritative information from NLM, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other government agencies and health-related organizations.

Current Clinical Trials Relating to  Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

ClinicalTrials.gov: Provides patients, family members, and members of the public easy and free access to information on clinical studies for a wide range of diseases and conditions.

20 Clinical Trials Returned