ChiroACCESS Article



Traditional Versus a Modified Problem-based Learning Activity: Is There a Difference in Student Knowledge Retention?



This information is provided to you for use in conjunction with your clinical judgment and the specific needs of the patient.

Martha A. Kaeser, MA, DC

  

Jeffrey Kamper, DC

  

Cheryl Hawk, DC, PhD, CHES

  

No Affiliation



Published on

July 8, 2014

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Abstract


Objective: This comparative study of a modified problem based learning activity examined the knowledge retention immediately after instruction and at six weeks post-instruction in two groups of students who were presented patient information either through a teacher-led lecture or student-directed patient interaction.

Methods: Eighty-four students were randomly divided into two groups; active participation versus didactic. Students were provided information on a patient with neurological signs and symptoms. This was done either through a teacher-led verbal and written presentation of the case or a collaborative student directed thorough history taking and examination using a standardized patient.

Results: The majority in both groups reported that they would retain information if they were actively involved in the learning process (91% and 94%, respectively). Overall, the group that was able to interact with a patient during a clinical simulation scored statistically significantly higher on both Test 1 (CI, 0.2-1.9) and Test 2 (CI, 0.3-1.7).

Discussion: Problem based learning activities include varying aspects of student participation. Students report higher satisfaction with activities in which they actively participate. There is a paucity of research demonstrating that factual knowledge retention increases when students are actively involved.

Conclusion: Overall, this study suggested that there may be differences in knowledge retention when instruction is provided actively versus didactically.

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