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The Effect of Sleep Surfaces on Shoulder and Back Pain



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ChiroACCESS Editorial Staff

  

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July 21, 2010

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Neck PainHumans spend nearly one third of their lives sleeping and new research is giving us a better understanding of the value of sleep and its importance to overall health.  Despite the crucial need for quality sleep, it is estimated that 70 million people in the United States have sleep problems and many of these sleep problems may involve musculoskeletal conditions.  One of the common questions from chiropractic patients involves recommending a quality mattress or suggesting which mattress is "best" for a particular patient.  Until this past decade there were very few research studies investigating the relative merits of various sleeping surfaces.

A recent (June 2010) study at Oklahoma State University experimented with the effects of sleep surfaces on chronic low back pain and shoulder pain sufferers.  The study found that tailored medium-firm foam surfaced mattresses layered to conform to the patient's desired sleeping position gave significant pain relief.  Some of the studies below make clear that one size does not fit all considering there are numerous variables associated with the proper mattress.   These variables include gender, body weight, sleeping position, low back and shoulder problems. 

Note:  These mini-reviews are designed as updates and direct the reader to the full text of current research.  The abstracts presented here are no substitute for reading and critically reviewing the full text of the original research.  Where permitted we will direct the reader to that full text.

Effect of prescribed sleep surfaces on back pain and sleep quality in patients diagnosed with low back and shoulder pain.  [LINK]

Appl Ergon. 2010 Jun 24. [Epub ahead of print]

Jacobson BH, Boolani A, Dunklee G, Shepardson A, Acharya H.
204 Willard Hall, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA.

The purpose of this study was to assess sleep quality and comfort of participants diagnosed with low back pain and stiffness following sleep on individually prescribed mattresses based on dominant sleeping positions. Subjects consisted of 27 patients (females, n=14; males, n=13; age 44.8 yrs+/-SD 14.6, weight 174lb.+/-SD 39.6, height 68.3 in.+/-SD 3.7) referred by chiropractic physicians for the study. For the baseline (pretest) data subjects recorded back and shoulder discomfort, sleep quality and comfort by visual analog scales (VAS) for 21 days while sleeping in their own beds. Subsequently, participants' beds were replaced by medium-firm mattresses specifically layered with foam and latex based on the participants' reported prominent sleeping position and they again rated their sleep comfort and quality daily for the following 12 weeks. Analysis yielded significant differences between pre- and post means for all variables and for back pain, we found significant (p<0.01) differences between the first posttest mean and weeks 4 and weeks 8-12, thus indicating progressive improvement in both back pain and stiffness while sleeping on the new mattresses. Additionally, the number of days per week of experiencing poor sleep and physical discomfort decreased significantly. It was concluded that sleep surfaces are related to sleep discomfort and that is indeed possible to reduce pain and discomfort and to increase sleep quality in those with chronic back pain by replacing mattresses based on sleeping position. Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Better backs by better beds?  [LINK]


Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2008 Apr 1;33(7):703-8.

Bergholdt K, Fabricius RN, Bendix T.
Back Research Center, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Backcenter Funen, Ringe, Denmark.

STUDY DESIGN: A "randomized"/stratified, single-blinded, parallel-group study.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate 3 structurally different mattresses relative influence on patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP).

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In several advertisements, it is proclaimed that certain mattresses have a positive effect on LBP, and especially a hard mattress is commonly believed to have a positive effect.

METHODS: One hundred sixty CLBP patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups, having a mattress/bed mounted in their sleeping room for 1 month. The beds were: (1) waterbed (Akva), (2) body-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night.

RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients before baseline, the analyses were performed on 141 patients. During the 1-month trial period another 27 patients stopped ahead of time, which were accounted for by "worse case" as well as "no-change" analyses. Both the waterbed and the foam mattress seemed superior to the hard mattress, especially when using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed.

CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences were small.

Changes in back pain, sleep quality, and perceived stress after introduction of new bedding systems.  [LINK]

J Chiropr Med. 2009 Mar;8(1):1-8.

Jacobson BH, Boolani A, Smith DB.
Professor, School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, Health and Human Performance, Oklahoma State University, OK 74078.

OBJECTIVE: This study compared sleep quality and stress-related symptoms between older beds (>/=5 years) and new bedding systems.

METHODS: A convenience sample of healthy subjects (women = 30; men = 29) with minor musculoskeletal sleep-related pain and compromised sleep, but with no clinical history of disturbed sleep, participated in the study. Subjects recorded back discomfort and sleep quality upon waking for 28 consecutive days in their own beds (baseline) and for 28 consecutive days (post) on a new bedding system using visual analog scales. Following baseline measures, participant's beds were replaced by new, medium-firm beds, and they again rated their sleep quality and back discomfort. Stress was assessed by a modified stress questionnaire.

RESULTS: Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to treat sleep quality and efficiency and factored responses of the stress items. Results indicated that the subjects' personal bedding systems average 9.5 years old and were moderately priced. Significant (P < .01) improvements were found between pre- and posttest mean values in sleep quality and efficiency. Continued improvement was noted for each of the 4-week data gathering period. Stress measures yielded similar positive changes between pre- and posttest mean values.

CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it was concluded that, in this population, new bedding systems increased sleep quality and reduced back discomfort, factors that may be related to abatement of stress-related symptoms.

Grouped comparisons of sleep quality for new and personal bedding systems.  [LINK]

Appl Ergon. 2008 Mar;39(2):247-54. Epub 2007 Jun 26.

Jacobson BH, Wallace TJ, Smith DB, Kolb T.
School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, Applied Musculoskeletal and Human Physiology Research Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA. bert.jacobson@okstate.edu

The purpose of this study was to compare sleep comfort and quality between personal and new bedding systems. A convenience sample (women, n=33; men, n=29) with no clinical history of disturbed sleep participated in the study. Subjects recorded back and shoulder pain, sleep quality, comfort, and efficiency for 28 days each in their personal beds (pre) and in new medium-firm bedding systems (post). Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed significant improvement between pre- and post-test means for all dependent variables. Furthermore, reduction of pain and stiffness and improvement of sleep comfort and quality became more prominent over time. No significant differences were found for the groupings of age, weight, height, or body mass index. It was found that for the cheapest category of beds, lower back pain was significantly (p<0.01) more prominent than for the medium and higher priced beds. Average bed age was 9.5yrs. It was concluded that new bedding systems can significantly improve selected sleep variables and that continuous sleep quality may be dependent on timely replacement of bedding systems.

Subjective rating of perceived back pain, stiffness and sleep quality following introduction of medium-firm bedding systems.  [LINK]

J Chiropr Med. 2006 Winter;5(4):128-34.

Jacobson BH, Wallace T, Gemmell H.
School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, Oklahoma State University.

PURPOSE: To compare personal and new bedding systems between subjects with reported high and low base line sleep quality.

METHODS: A convenience sample of healthy subjects (women = 30; men = 29) with no clinical history of disturbed sleep participated in the study. Subjects recorded perceived back discomfort and stiffness, sleep quality and comfort, and sleep efficiency upon waking for 28 consecutive days in their own beds (baseline) and for 28 consecutive days (post) on a new bedding system. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to treat sleep data.

RESULTS: Analysis revealed significant differences between pre- and post means in all areas for both high and low sleep quality groups. Analysis of sleep efficiency also yielded significant differences between, but not among pre- and post means. Improvement of sleep comfort and quality became more prominent with time (from wk 1 to 4 post observation).

CONCLUSIONS: Similar significant benefits of new, medium- firm bedding systems can occur for those reporting both good and poor current sleep quality and variables such as age, weight, height, and body mass index are independent of such improvements.

Effectiveness of a selected bedding system on quality of sleep, low back pain, shoulder pain, and spine stiffness.  [LINK]

J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2002 Feb;25(2):88-92.

Jacobson BH, Gemmell HA, Hayes BM, Altena TS.
School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, Health and Human Performance, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether clinical and statistically significant changes in back pain, shoulder pain, spine stiffness, and quality of sleep may be documented after use of a prescribed bedding system.

DESIGN: Quasi-experimental field study of single group pretest-posttest design with subjects serving as their own controls.

SETTING: Two chiropractic clinics and the Oklahoma State University Program of Health and Human Performance.

SUBJECTS: Convenience sample of 22 subjects (women, n = 13; men, n = 9) between the ages of 25 and 75 years with documented disturbed sleep, shoulder pain, low back pain, and spine stiffness of a chronic nature.

OUTCOME MEASURES: Pretest and posttest 28-day Visual Analog Scales for pain, spine stiffness, and quality of sleep.

MAIN RESULTS: The experimental bedding system reduced back pain by 57.21% (P =.000001), reduced shoulder pain by 60.83% (P =.000005), reduced back stiffness by 59.12% (P =.000004), and improved quality of sleep by 60.73% (P =.000001).

CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that subjects obtain significant improvement in shoulder and back pain, back stiffness, and quality of sleep after 28 days of prescribed bedding system use as compared with 28 days of personal bedding use. Female subjects and those with lower body weight were more likely to significantly improve than heavier and more obese subjects.
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The Effect of Sleep Surfaces on Shoulder and Back Pain

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Re:The Effect of Sleep Surfaces on Shoulder and Back Pain


by pauljackson   (12/25/2010 8:00:18 AM)
Ya sleep and the surface effects your back i had some back problem so met a chiropractor there are Posture Exercise designed for your body to retrain poor patterns of body motion.if you encounter any problems with these poses, you should consult an expert.
 
 
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